ONGOING PROJECTS
INSTALLATIONS

"What’s Wrong With This Country?"    2015

Koa Gallery, Hawaii
Needlepoint
Dimensions: 60 individual needlepoint canvases, each @ 8"x 8"

 
What’s Wrong With This Country
 
What’s Wrong With This Country
 
click to enlarge
 

In the year following the massacre of 20 children and 6 adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, CT on December 14, 2012, 60 children, age 10 and under, have killed either themselves or another child with a gun. The viewer can learn the first names and ages of the victims, and dates and locations of each incident by scanning the embroidered QR code with an app downloaded to a smartphone.

Huffington Post Link >

 
 

“What’s Wrong with This Country? - the next 12 months"    2016

Needlepoint
Dimensions: 12 individual needlepoint canvases, each @ 14” x 14

 
click to enlarge
 

In the second 12 months following the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School, 137 children aged 10 and under either shot themselves or another child or were shot by an adult.
Each of the 12 needlepoints in this piece provide statistics on a monthly basis which can be read with a QR code reader downloaded to a smart phone.

 
 
"WASTED"
Honolulu Museum of Art, Hawaii
January 29, 2016 - May 08, 2016
 
 
click to enlarge
 

Exhibition Overview

At first encounter, the large works in Honolulu artist Deborah G. Nehmad’s installation WASTED appear to be abstract triptych tapestries. Upon closer examination, however, the patterns of holes and stitches convey a powerful, poignant symbolism, functioning as catalogues of tragedy.

WASTED gradually reveals that nothing has changed in terms of gun violence in the United States over the past decade. The burned holes in wasted represent the number of children killed by guns in 2003 (left panel), 2004 (center panel) and 2005 (right panel). The holes in wasted (ii) represent the number of adults killed in the same years. Wasted (iii) records the annual average of gun fatalities from 2009 to 2013. The stitched red crosses represent homicides, the black x’s suicides and the burned holes left bare are accidents or of unknown intent. Casualties by police intervention are stitched over in red and black.

Using woodblocks that were burned during the process of creating the wasted pieces, Nehmad inked and rubbed the surface of the blocks to develop the series of printed works titled black and blue. The constellation of blue dots represents victims caught in the crosshairs of gun violence over the last 10 years.

While all artists want their work to be discussed, Nehmad has a greater mission—the possibility that viewers will talk about the issues involved, with the hope that there will be change in the future.

Exhibition review in Honolulu Star Advertiser >
Video of Artist Walk-Through >
Huffington Post Link >
Interview with Hiromi Paper >

 
 
 
"WASTED"
Kim Foster Gallery
529 West 20th Street, New York, NY
April 9 - May 9, 2015
 
 
     
click to enlarge
 

Video from Opening Reception >
Huffington Post Link >
Interview with Hiromi Paper >

 
 

"wasted", 2010
The Honolulu Museum of Art, Hawaii

exhibited 2012

graphite, scraping, beeswax, pyrography, thread on handmade Nepalese paper

each panel 68" x 39"

 
click to enlarge
 

"wasted" addresses the issue of gun violence in America. On each of three panels (each 68" x 39"), I have burned holes representing the number of children killed by guns in the years 2003 (left), 2004 (center) and 2005 (right). Red crosses represent homicides, black X's suicides and holes left bare are accidents.

 
 

"wasted (ii)", 2011-2012

graphite, scraping, beeswax, pyrography, thread on handmade Nepalese paper

each panel 68" x 39"

 
click to enlarge
 

"wasted (ii) represents the number of adults killed by guns in the years 2003 (left), 2004 (center) and 2005 (right).

 
 

"wasted (iii)", 2014

graphite, scraping, beeswax, pyrography, thread on handmade Nepalese paper

each panel 68" x 39"

 
click to enlarge
 

“wasted (iii)” continues the conversation about gun violence in America, revealing that nothing has changed in ten years. Burned holes represent the yearly average of adults and children killed by guns from 2009 - 2013. Red crosses represent homicides, black X’s suicides and holes left bare are accidents or of unknown intent. The holes stitched over in red and black are deaths by police intervention.

 
 
The Innocence Project, 2013-2014

pyrography, laser prints, on twenty two 35” x 27” sheets of Thai mulberry paper

 
details   
 

“The Innocence Project” is a visual translation of the lost time that wrongly incarcerated individuals  have spend in U.S. prisons on death row since 1973. The piece consists of 21 panels, each comprised of 4 sheets of paper, layered and stitched together. QR codes, readable through the use of a smart phone, reveal the name of each individual, the dates of his or her incarceration and eventual  exoneration.  A grid of rectangles has been burned through the paper. Each rectangle represents one week of incarceration - a total of 75,000+ weeks served by 144 inmates.

 
 

"black and blue (i) and (ii)", 2012–2014

relief and intaglio woodblock prints, screenprint, sumi ink on Japanese paper
48” x 24” – each panel

 
"black and blue (ii)(b)”
frontlit  
“black and blue (ii)(b)”
backlit
detail
click to enlarge
 

Using the woodblocks created with holes burned during the creation of wasted and wasted (ii) [above] , the entire constellation of blue dots in black and blue (ii) represents the total number of victims killed by guns in America in the years 2003, 2004, and 2005.

 

“black and blue (ii) (a)-(f)”

click to enlarge
 
 

"never again", 2008

Spalding House, Honolulu Museum of Art, Hawaii 2013

handmade Nepalese paper, graphite

39” x 68” (each of nine panels)

 
click to enlarge  
 
installation view   detail
 
 
 

Accounts of genocide in Darfur estimate over 200,000 fatalities.  Installed, “never again" surrounds the viewer with fields of columns of handwritten sequential numbers  from 1 through 213,434, portraying visually what cannot be adequately expressed through the abstraction of a six digit figure.

 
Interview with Hiromi Paper >
 
 
"collateral damage"   
Hawaii State Art Museum 2010-2011
graphite and pyrography on Stonehenge paper

30' x 31-32" (each scroll), 2006-2011

 
details (click to enlarge) details (click to enlarge)
 

“collateral damage” is an honor role of those killed in the Iraq war between 2003 - 2011.  Branded numbers are the dates each coalition soldier died.  Handwritten numbers enumerate civilians who were killed on or about the same date.